Paris & Milan
Fantasy Scrapbooks

LOUIS VUITTON

Milan and Paris Fashion Weeks may be over but the excitement for the season’s clothes is still palpable – so much so that we’ve created our own imagined AW15 scrapbooks mapping the fantasy thought processes of four of our favourite designers. All on beautifully streamlined Smythson notebooks of course.

Presented in the imposing surroundings of Paris’ Fondation Louis Vuitton, Nicolas Ghesquière’s collection outfitted the travellers of the future; it was his catwalk answer to David Bowie’s Life on Mars. Plush white fabrics and space age details called to mind the original Haute Couture futurist, André Courrèges, while the classic Vuitton trunk has been recast in contemporary materials. Slick white silk suiting worn with logo tees echoed 90s minimalism as well as the Austrian designer who defined the look, Helmut Lang.

FENDI

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Collection images style.com,Palazzo della Civita mimoa.eu, Sophie Taeuber-Arp ‘Equilibre’ 1932 at Museo Corres, Sophie Taeuber-Arp portrait via peak.org, Bright Ideas wafer notebook by Smythson

 

At Fendi, Karl Lagerfeld imagined an elegant army, striding confidently in angular uniforms inspired by mid-century Italian architecture – the jewel in the crown being the Palazzo della Civita, Fendi‘s planned headquarters for the next 15 years. Padded and generous, plush fur appliqué gives a feeling of protective garb, albeit in an ultra luxurious manner! The minimal and precisely composed abstract work of Swiss artist Sophie Taeuber-Arp was surely another inspiration.

GIORGIO ARMANI

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Giorgio Armani AW15 Collection images style.com, Marc Chagall ‘Dance’ 1962, Vincent van Gogh ‘The Starry Night’ 1889 Bright Ideas wafer notebook, Smythson

Giorgio Armanis collection appears to chronicle the designer’s many trips to art galleries and museums throughout the brand’s glamorous 50-year reign. Delicate, woven fabrics in blues and greys recall the work of Marc Chagall, while tufted, layered and sculpted fabrics called to mind the expressive brushstrokes of another creative master, Vincent Van Gogh. Evening ensembles combining feminine details and fabrics with masculine cuts would not have looked amiss in Katherine Hepburn’s wardrobe.

CHANEL

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Collection images style.com, Karl Lagerfeld 1972 via photo.wordpress.com, Izis Bidermana. Boulevrad Montmatre, 1966, Lovers in a Small Cafe by Brassai 1932

 

Karl Lagerfeld’s many hours whiled away at the chrome-topped bars of Parisian brasseries inspired Chanel‘s catwalk luncheon, set at the fictitious Brasserie Gabrielle, in the Grand Palais. The collection presented a variety of skirt lengths, silhouettes and layering – the picture of Parisian streetstyle elegance. The inspiration could have come from photographer Brassaï’s many snapshots of French café culture, or Lagerfeld’s wild nights in 1970s bistros and discotheques. Coco Chanel herself was of course an overarching influence, best seen in the show’s footwear, which marked a return to the classic beige and black Chanel slingback.

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First picture:

Louis Vuitton AW15 Collection images style.com, white Courrèges outfit as worn by Nicole de la Marge, André Courrèges at work theblogmagazine.com, Louis Vuitton trunk Pinterest, Helmut Lang portriat The Independent