Surrealist Worlds – Moschino AW17 Jeremy Scott

 

Surrealist Worlds - Moschino AW17 Jeremy Scott
Bella and her paper hat

 

Moschino AW17 Jeremy Scott:

People often forget about the point of humour in Surrealism. Indeed, the king of melting clocks and matchstick legged elephants, Salvador Dali, is today considered more of a comedy hero – famous for his witty repartee and silly moustache  – than a thought-provoking artist who used absurdity and humour in his paintings as a way of questioning our sapience as human beings. Surrealism of the 1920s was not made to make people laugh; instead it aimed to explore untapped cognitive areas of the mind and to question very concept of existence which was seemingly only ‘real’ in the waking hours. What happens, the Surrealists would ask, when we sleep? Do hallucinatory visions not count? What is existence if it has other dimensions that we can’t remember? Rather than enter a philosophical debate, consider the latest Moschino catwalk for AW17 by the Great Fashion Hell Raiser, Jeremy Scott, whose latest show for the Italian label was brimming with surrealist humour in the traditional sense. Why? Because scratch the surface absurdity and frivolity and you’ll find a deeper meaning to his playful collection.

Surrealist Worlds - Moschino AW17 Jeremy Scott

Surrealist Worlds - MoschinoAW17Jeremy Scott2

Surrealist Worlds – Moschino AW17 Jeremy Scott

The invite to the show was a pretend mousetrap hinting at the idea of nuisance pests and unwanted detritus.  Sure enough, out came his fancy dress crew as they do every season, forever typecast as cartoonish characters dressed in the emblems of our consumer culture. But this time, Scott was not concerned with embracing excess and physical ideals (see his SS17 cut out dolls collection); instead, he was drawn to the notion of waste, using ‘cast-away’ objects and ‘rubbish’ to create bin-liner dresses and a whole lot of  what he later termed “cardboard couture.”

Bella Hadid wore a dress made out of old watches; her friend Kendall Jenner appeared to have made her hat Blue Peter-style from a DHL delivery box. The clothes were clever trompe l’oeil creations that really did look recyclable – an upside down brown paper bag  was convincing as a t-shirt – the cotton material was in fact cannily crumbled to mimic the texture of paper. Elsewhere, a matching ‘cardboard’ pencil skirt had faux packing stickers printed on it. Another full length-gown was seemingly worn with the cellophane wrapping  of a dry clean service – another trick of the eye. Jeremy Scott, like a modern surrealist is playful, fun and creatively daring, but he’s also trying to worm his way into the inner workings of our psyche. What makes us tick? What makes us want these catwalk looks that actually sort of poke fun at luxury consumers? It’s a twisted logic but somehow the designer has flipped this irony to his advantage. Moschino AW17 isn’t intended to be heavy in its allegory, but like all good idiosyncratic art, these clothes make us smile and turn an existing dimension into something new.

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Surrealist Worlds - Moschino AW17 Jeremy Scott

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